Tag Archives: work for yourself

Ten things they don’t tell you in business school about running your own business

Water lillies
Nurture your business

By Marianne Curphey

1. Business plans don’t work…. or rather, they don’t come to fruition in the ways you expect. When you have a fledging business it is very hard to predict the speed and way in which it will develop over the next year, never mind the next five years. So although it is important to have goals and objectives, don’t be too rigid in implementing them if new opportunities come along.

2. The business idea you start with won’t be the one you finish up with. One of the most exciting things about running your own business is watching it evolve into a bigger and better project than the one you started with. Dream big!

3. Nobody pays on time. Many a brilliant business has suffered and/or collapsed because creditors were tardy in paying up. Plan for late payment, and put measures in place to ensure you chase up unpaid invoices at regular intervals. This means having a robust system for logging work, invoices and payments, which will become more important as your business grows.

4. It’s harder work….and better fun than you could ever imagine. No more office politics, boring meetings, tiresome commutes to work…..but also no more being paid to chat by the water cooler or take long lunchbreaks.

5.People in PAYE jobs secretly think you watch daytime TV all the time. Some of them say it to your face. Relax, they’re just jealous. Disarm them by telling them how they too can make the break for freedom.

6. Cashflow, not a great business concept, is what keeps your business afloat in the long run. You can have a whole stadium’s worth of fantastic ideas, brilliantly executed, but if you don’t keep on top of your utility bills, tax payments, NI costs and other administrative tasks, your business will fail.

7. Diversification can save you in tough times. Try to think of as many ways as possible to monetise your ideas, both through active and passive sources of income. Think creatively.

8. Carry your business card everywhere. There is nowhere that’s out of bounds for networking, as long as you do it subtly and respectfully.

9. You are the brand. Your unique blend of skills and experience are what makes your business special.

10. Admin takes up about 50% of your time. When you plan your week, make sure you factor in enough time to deal with the boring stuff – bills, insurance, and well as the fun bits.

In my next blog I’ll be looking at how to manage your finances in a small business,

regards, Marianne

Why right now is the perfect time to launch your own business

Time to become your own boss?
Why now is the perfect time to launch a business

So you want to run your own business, either because you are sick of your job, you’ve been made redundant, or you’ve had a long-held dream of creating something special? That’s great, because there has never been a better time to run your own show.

Contrary to received wisdom, new businesses can and do survive in tough economic times. The difference between launching your own business in a time of austerity is that you really have to think through your niche, your offering and your unique selling point (USP) in a way that you might not have needed to when money was plentiful.

And here’s why now is the perfect time to become self-employed:

1. Secure jobs are illusory: cut-backs, redudancies and downsizing in companies big and small show that there is no such thing as a job for life…..or even for the next five years. Just because you are on PAYE does not mean that your salary has a gold-plated guarantee. Self-employment offers a much more bumpy ride, income-wise, but no-one can ever fire you.

2.You can’t get finance: in my opinion this is an excellent discipline. We’ve all seen the figures about how one in three small businesses fail in the first few years, despite their creators writing fabulous, long-winded business plans to soothe the nerves of the bank manager when they are trying to get a bank loan. Creating a business that requires minimal investment and leaves you in total control is the best way to control costs and survive in a tough economic climate.

3.You’ll awaken your passion: who wants to hang around in a job they hate until the economy picks up…. or until they retire? Life is too short to spend eight or more hours every day doing something you hate. Finding an outlet for your creative business energy will inject more excitement and fun into your life than you ever dreamed possible.

4. Your business idea will need real focus: lots of flakey business concepts struggle on in good times because of the glut of disposable income. In a recession, you need to find an idea or product that people really need. This is absolutely the best discipline for concentrating your mind on how, why and where you will sell your products, and to whom.

5. The power of the internet is perfect for small businesses: once you were constrained by geographical boundaries, now thanks to social media, Google searches and the power of Facebook and Twitter you can potentially reach hundreds of thousands of prospective customers across the country – and the globe. This is perfect for tightly-targeted niche products which may have a limited market in the UK but a huge market on a global scale via internet marketing and selling.

In my next blogs I’ll be looking at what business schools don’t teach you about running your own business, and how to set up a micro-business while you are still in a job,

regards, Marianne